Thursday, November 13, 2014 12:00–1:30 PM (Eastern)

REMOVING BARRIERS: Active Transportation Infrastructure

Active transportation infrastructure needs to be improved in the many communities where on-street and off-street routes are often sparse and of varying quality, and where linkages between active modes and public transit can be poor. While municipalities are responsible for building most walking and cycling facilities, provinces and territories can also play a key role. This webinar will explore provincial initiatives that involve direct action or cost-sharing mechanisms to shift local priorities and facilitate change. Cost-sharing can help meet the goals of multiple governments, and can mitigate costs that can be higher for infrastructure modifications in existing areas than for entirely new routes.

HIGHWAY FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE PARTNERSHIPS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Alan Callander, Transportation Policy, British Columbia Transportation and Infrastructure
Since 2001, British Columbia has allocated $150 million for cycling, which includes work on new or upgraded highways that must include wide shoulders or designated lanes for cycling unless exempted. Since 2004, the province’s Cycling Infrastructure Partnerships Program has provided up to $2 million annually to share the costs of commuter cycling facility improvements by local governments.

ROUTE VERTE: QUEBEC’S SIGNATURE CYCLING ROUTE
Jean-François Pronovost, Development and Public Affairs, Vélo Québec Association
Quebec launched the Route Verte in 1995, in collaboration with Vélo Québec which now promotes, plans and manages the network. The province invested $88.5 million over ten years to develop a 5,000-kilometre route that serves both recreational and commuter cyclists. Through funding and incentives, the program has motivated many rural, suburban and urban communities to plan and build their own cycling facilities.

DEVELOPING PROVINCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE IN NOVA SCOTIA
Ben Buckwold, Bicycle Nova Scotia & Elizabeth Pugh, Nova Scotia Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal
Nova Scotia’s efforts to improve provincial infrastructure for active transportation include the Blue Route initiative, which involves working with several provincial departments, municipalities and other organizations to create a province-wide cycling network. The Blue Route could provide an important link between the active transportation plans being developed by Nova Scotia’s communities.

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